Who said you won’t need a 3D printer when you’re equipping hospitals with necessary equipment? This is a story about INMED-Karczewscy, a Polish company that uses the ZMorph 3D printer to save money and time on various prototypes.

About INMED

INMED-Karczewscy is a company located in Krępice, Poland. Their clients include not only domestic hospitals, but also institutions abroad. They specialize in making custom hospital equipment such as bed head units, operating lamps, ceiling pendants, or ICU beams.

Ceiling pendant designed by INMED.
Ceiling pendant designed by INMED.

We’ve reached Jakub Łakomy from Design Engineering Department, and asked him what do they use a ZMorph 3D printer for, and how the process of making hospital equipment looks like.

Designing Medical Equipment

With advanced technology such as hospital equipment, the company needs to use a lot of prototypes. This is because the original parts for the final products need to be custom-made, preferably from durable materials like aluminum or stainless steel. Therefore INMED used to outsource 3D printed prototypes to test designs, adjust and fine-tune various projects

Ceiling pendant control panel.
Control panel designed by INMED. The green prototype was 3D printed on ZMorph Multitool 3D Printer to test dimensions and accessibility.

Unfortunately, outsourcing is usually more expensive than manufacturing in house, especially when it happens daily. It takes much more time too and this may sabotage some important projects where the time factor is crucial. And what happens if the prototype is faulty? Another few days spent waiting for a new model. So how to limit the time and money? One way is to implement an all-in-one 3D printer such as ZMorph VX in the workflow.

Ceiling pendant control panel.
Control panel designed by INMED. The green prototype was 3D printed on ZMorph Multitool 3D Printer to test dimensions and accessibility.

In-House Prototyping with ZMorph 3D Printer

Since purchasing the ZMorph 3D printer INMED was able to save on costs and time of prototyping a lot. The investment (of buying the machine) returned in less than a year. Now every part can be 3D printed with cheap plastic filament, tested, fine-tuned, and redesigned if necessary. The final project can be sent to another company that will produce metal parts using injection molding or CNC milling

INMED 3D printed custom parts.
3D printed prototype (front) and end-part created using injection molding (back).

The biggest advantage of a 3D printed prototype is that it can be touched, rotated in every direction, and finally, you can see how it matches other parts. You can’t do that with a digital 3D model on a computer screen. It happens often that one might think the designed part will fit, but the 3D printed prototype turns out to be too big or too small.

3D printed plugs, different iterations.
Various 3D printed plugs.

Additionally, INMED can produce small plastic parts such as gaskets, plugs or supports themselves quickly and with minimum costs. Without the ZMorph 3D printer, they would have to wait a few days and pay for the work of someone else to make small plugs such as the one in the picture below.

“In our business sector, we attach great importance to details. Thanks to the ZMorph 3D Printer, it is possible to reflect every detail with the highest accuracy. This is extremely important when designing medical devices often used for saving human lives.”

Jakub Łakomy, Design Engineering Department
3D printed plug on bed head unit.
Final design and various earlier iterations. 3D printed on ZMorph Multitool 3D Printer.

Samples of INMED 3D Printed Prototypes

3D printed prototype of a ceiling pendant control panel.
3D printed prototype of a ceiling pendant control panel.
3D printed prototype and end-part.
3D printed prototype (front) and end-part (back).
3D printed fixture for a valve.
3D printed fixture for a valve.
3D printed fixture for a valve.
3D printed fixture for a valve.
3D printed custom part.
Before outsourcing injection molding, INMED could test the design by 3D printing this part.
End-product and the 3D printed prototype.
End-product and the 3D printed prototype.
Close-up of a 3D printed plug on a bed head unit.

Get a Quote

Are you currently looking for a 3D printer for your company? Contact us at hello@zmorph3d.com and we will tell you how you can implement ZMorph VX All-In-One 3D Printer in your workflow. Click here to get a custom quote.

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Content Manager at ZMorph

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